Friday, October 20, 2017

Workshop Descriptions


CEU Information

Educators: All workshops qualify for New Jersey Department of Education continuing education credits.

Workshops marked with APA qualify for American Psychological Association CE for psychologists.

Workshops marked with ASHA qualify for American Speech-Language-Hearing Association CEUs for speech-language pathologists

Workshops marked with BACB qualify for Behavior Analyst Certification Board Type 2 CEUs for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA-D, BCBA, and BCaBA). 

Workshops marked with SW qualify for NJ Social Work Continuing Education Approval Collaborative CEUs for social workers

Learn more about CEUs.


Session D
9:00am to 10:15am

D31  Life on the Spectrum: The Female Perspective  ASHA  SW

Tracey Cohen, B.S., author and Becca Lory, CAS, BCSS, Evolving Skye
Diagnosed late in life, Becca and Tracey will share their personal insights and lessons learned as women living on the autism spectrum. Topics explored will include differences between males and females experiences' with ASD; the value of a correct diagnosis at any age; the myths and challenges of life on the spectrum; coping strategies and resources they've found helpful; and so much more. They will share raw, honest, and genuine life experiences to enable participants to gain a more profound appreciation for life on the autism spectrum. Participant questions are encouraged as a Q&A session will follow the presentations.

D32  Making Parenting a Win-Win: How to Succeed at Teaching Your Child Wherever You Are

Kevin Brothers, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Somerset Hills Learning Institute
This workshop will share a systematic approach that parents can use to become more skillful. Specifically, the presenter will show and describe how his staff taught parents to identify and respond to their child’s initiations and effectively handle disruptive behavior. Videos and role playing opportunities will be provided to enable participants to succeed at teaching their own children more successfully.

D33  Funding for Residential Placements

Lisa Parles, Esq., Parles Rekem

The NJ Statewide Transition Plan and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rules and regulations governing residential settings will be addressed. Particular emphasis will be on how to establish eligibility and access funding for residential placements. In addition, participants will be provided with a basic knowledge of how to obtain residential funding for individuals under the age of 21 through the Children’s System of Care as a way to supplement and support school district placements and services. DDD funding for residential placements for individuals over 21 through the Community Care Waiver will also be presented. The waiting list will be discussed as well as how placements can be made on an emergency basis, bypassing the waiting list. Specific information on a variety of housing projects will also be presented.

D34  How to Address Denials of FAPE

Ira Fingles, Esq., Hinkle, Fingles, Prior & Fischer

It is an unfortunate reality that the special education rights of students with ASD are sometimes violated. Examples caregivers have shared include predetermined IEPs, their child's assignment to teachers or aides with no experience in autism, and decisions made on the basis of the cost rather than individual needs. Parents often have little understanding of how such violations can be remedied. The aim of this workshop is to educate and inform caregivers of their rights when faced with obvious (and not-so-obvious) violations of their children’s rights and to assist educators in understanding the risk and nature of possible liability for legal violations. Among the issues to be discussed are how to recognize common types of legal violations, strategies to address them, and how to ensure that outcomes of informal and legal advocacy are meaningful and beneficial to the student.

D35  Accepting No: Support Strategies to Increase Self-regulation  APA  ASHA  BACB   SW

Terese Dana, M.S., BCBA, Laura Adaptive Recreation Center

Regulating emotions to successfully respond to life's everyday challenges and disappointments is an important building block to good social skills. Because the denial of access to requested reinforcers often evokes challenging behavior, operations that lessen the likelihood of challenging behavior in response to imposed limits are important components of any behavior intervention plan. In this workshop, specific self-management strategies will be introduced to reduce the negative behaviors triggered by the denial of preferred activities, persons, or items. Participants will learn how to incorporate a categorization system that uses visuals as supplementary cues and prompts to increase self-regulation.

D36  Promoting Independent and Social Leisure Skills in Adolescents and Adults  APA  BACB   SW 

Mary McDonald, Ph.D, BCBA-D, LBA, Hofstra University & Eden II Programs and Anya Silver, M.A., BCBA, Quality Services for the Autism Community

Many individuals with ASD do well when their time is structured and they are “working”. However, one of the more difficult times of the day is when there is downtime or unstructured time. Due to the lack of leisure skills exhibited by many adolescents and adults with ASD, we often see that this is a time when issues arise. Individuals with autism may be more likely to engage in challenging or disruptive behavior, exhibit repetitive or ritualistic behavior, or become a distraction to others in their environment. Both independent and social leisure skills are of importance and can be taught using teaching methods based in applied behavior analysis. This presentation will focus on the importance of the assessment process and provide ideas for teaching such skills.

D37  You Can Build a Better ABA Program! Methods to Improve Your Services, Part 1  APA  BACB

Maureen Solan, M.S.Ed., BCBA, LBA and Elizabeth Golini, M.S.Ed., BCBA, LBA; The New England Center for Children

This workshop will discuss three effective and essential components for a successful ABA program based on evidence-based practice and real-world experience. The strategies to be discussed are applicable to both home and school-based programming. Participants will have the ability to practice some of the skills in the workshop sessions. This workshop is ideal for people who work or supervise in ABA-based programs currently. It is also appropriate for family members to ensure that they ask the right questions so that their child is in an effective ABA program.

Maximizing ABA Workshop Sponsor:

D38  Aided Language Modeling Interventions  ASHA  BACB

Joseph Novak, Ed.D., BCBA-D, CCC-SLP, ATP, REED Academy

This workshop is designed to provide professionals and parents with an overview to aided language modeling, a technique often recommended for individuals who use AAC. The workshop will review the research-to-date on AAC, modeling, and aided language modeling. In addition, the workshop will review the presenter’s dissertation study and provide recommendations for implementation of aided language modeling with individuals with autism.

D39  Ethical Considerations for Behavior Analysts Providing Services through Health Insurance  APA  BACB

Craig Domanski, Ph.D., BCBA-D, The DATA Group and Cara Graham, M.A., BCBA, Graham Behavior Services

Recent legislation mandating that certain health insurance plans cover ABA treatment has increased the availability of services for families impacted by ASD. However, as policies and regulations regarding the mandate are changing frequently, it is important for practitioners to stay informed and up-to-date. Additionally, ethical conundrums can arise when these regulations do not align with current best practices in our field or relevant parties are acting based on misunderstanding or misinformation. This workshop aims to (a) inform the behavior-analytic community as to the general health insurance process, (b) describe specific scenarios that practitioners may encounter that involve ethical dilemmas, (c) discuss how to best align the policies set forth by health insurance carriers with the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code, and (d) discuss misconceptions about the health insurance process that may be important to your practice.

D40  Current Advances in the Treatment of Food Selectivity  APA  ASHA  BACB 

Merrill Berkowitz, Ph.D., BCBA-D, St. Joseph's Children's Hospital

Feeding problems are common in children diagnosed with autism.  Food selectivity, or the consumption of a limited variety of foods across foods groups, is the most frequently seen difficulty with these children.  Due to their limited intake, these children are at higher risk for nutritional deficiencies and further limited social contacts with peers.  Several factors may contribute to a feeding problem in children with autism and consist of medical issues, oral-motor skill deficits, and learned behaviors to avoid consuming specific foods.   Several behavioral treatments have been reported in the literature to increase the number of foods children exhibiting food selectivity consume.   The current workshop will describe those contributing factors, review several treatment interventions described in the literature to increase the number of foods children diagnosed with autism consume and introduce two additional interventions that have been recently developed and empirically examined.   

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Session E
10:30am to 11:45am

E41  Navigating the DDD Service System   SW 

Nkechi Ugoji, MSW, LSW, NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities
Attendees at this session will learn about the system reform occurring within the Division of Developmental Disabilities. This workshop will provide insight into the intake and eligibility process as well as services offered through individual service plans. The method for selecting a support coordination agency will be explained and the agencies’ responsibilities described. It will also address quality improvement efforts being made by the Division to ensure continued improvements to service delivery for individuals within this service system.

E42  Autism Families and Law Enforcement: Bridging the Gap   SW

Gerald Turning, Jr., Tinton Falls Police Department
An overwhelming number of families affected by ASD harbor fear and anxiety toward law enforcement and its capacity, motivation, and skill in providing appropriate service to their families. Many have expressed a hesitation to call the police for assistance during a time of crisis involving their loved one with autism. This, to me, is tragic and unacceptable. While recent high profile incidents have increased this anxiety, there is good news: autism awareness training  for law enforcement professionals has expanded exponentially in recent years and continues to grow and improve. There is still a glaring missing component, however: communication. The first step is an open and honest dialogue. So, let's talk.

E43  Interventions to Support Siblings and the Sibling Relationship  APA  BACB   SW

Emily Jones, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA and Theresa Fiani, B.A.; Queens College & the Graduate Center, CUNY
Autism affects the entire family system; this includes siblings and the sibling relationship. Sibling relationships provide children’s first peer interactions, lifelong friendship and, when one sibling has autism, sometimes caregiving and advocacy. But, by its very nature, autism can strain that sibling relationship and sometimes negatively impact mental health in typically developing siblings. Thus, many families seek resources for their typically developing children. We will describe our SIBS Club program and research examining the effects of support groups and sibling training on both sibling mental health and the sibling relationship. We will also describe potential child and family factors to consider in seeking out these different interventions. 

E44  Making Evidence-based Decisions: Learning to Use the Decision Tree Protocol  ASHA  BACB

Katherine Baker, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Behavior Analysts of Oregon and Anjalee Nirgudkar, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Behavior Analysts of New Jersey
A common problem in ABA programs is the inefficient use of data that are collected. The Decision Tree Protocol is an evidence-based, decision-making model that allows for the analysis of student learning and performance. The protocol is depicted as a set of rules and presented as a formula for how and when to intervene or continue data collection. It is an efficiency measure that seeks to obtain the highest rate of acquisition and provides a truly individualized approach for optimal student performance. Following an evidence-based decision algorithm has been shown to increase the likelihood that teaching strategies are effective and students are learning. This is an effective teaching tool for instructors specializing in the principles and tactics related to applied behavior analysis.

E45  Increasing Flexibility and Problem Solving  APA  ASHA  BACB   SW

Helen Bloomer, M.S., BCBA, LBA, Helen Bloomer Autism Consultation and Mary McDonald, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA, Eden II Programs & Hofstra University

This workshop will provide an overview of behavioral and cognitive flexibility and the importance of focusing on these areas with students with ASD. Often students with autism adhere to fixed routines, rote repetitive responding, or appear to have limited repertoires of responses. This workshop will also highlight the importance of problem solving and generating multiple solutions. Specific skills will be addressed and strategies will be discussed for increasing flexibility and problem solving.

E46  You Can Build a Better ABA Program! Methods to Improve Services, Part 2  APA  BACB

Maureen Solan, M.S.Ed., BCBA, LBA and Elizabeth Golini, M.S.Ed., BCBA, LBA; The New England Center for Children
This workshop will discuss three effective and essential components for a successful ABA program based on evidence-based practice and real-world experience. The strategies to be discussed are applicable to both home and school-based programming. Participants will have the ability to practice some of the skills in the workshop sessions. This workshop is ideal for people who work or supervise in ABA-based programs currently. It is also appropriate for family members to ensure that they ask the right questions so that their child is in an effective ABA program.

Maximizing ABA Workshop Sponsor:

E47  Teaching Weight Management Skills: It Takes a Partnership  BACB

Debra Brothers, BSN, RN and Kevin Brothers, Ph.D., BCBA-D; Somerset Hills Learning Institute
Overweight and obesity, especially among children with ASD, is a growing national concern with imminent and lifelong health implications.  Via routine school screenings, three children and one young adult with ASD were identified as overweight, obese, or underweight. An individualized treatment package was implemented for each student. Parents were coached to measure food consumption, reduce servings of nutritionally poor foods, increase servings of nutrient-rich foods, and increase daily physical activity using a shaping procedure. Results indicate reversal of trend in body mass index (BMI) for all four students. Outcomes represent an effective, individualized, school-based multidisciplinary collaboration of behavior analysts, health professionals, and parents to manage unhealthy weight in students with ASD.  

E48  Using ABA to Help Adults to be Prepared for Work in an "Employment First" State  APA  ASHA  BACB   SW

Gregory MacDuff, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Princeton Child Development Institute and Eric Rozenblat, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Institute for Educational Achievement

The presenters will briefly review the literature on supported employment and provide program descriptions of the adult programs under their direction. The presentation will include descriptions of individualized programs, research projects, and accountability systems that have proven successful in assisting adults with autism to enter into the workforce, to maintain employment long term, and to become valued members of their workplace communities. Finally, the results of annual consumer evaluations will be reviewed and summarized to posit the importance of such data in establishing and maintaining effective and accountable programs for adults with autism.

E49  An Obligation to Be Empirical: Our Philosophy of Treatment and the Driving Force Behind Our Work  APA  BACB 

Thomas Zane, Ph.D., BCBA-D, University of Kansas

The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code of the BACB specifies the standards that must be maintained by Board Certified Behavior Analysts. Historically, strong adherence to its theme of science and empiricism has led to successful treatment of autism, public recognition that ABA is the only treatment approach with strong empirical evidence of effectiveness, and a high credibility with parents and other consumers. This presentation will provide a conceptualization of science and scientifically supported treatments, discuss the importance of such an approach, and describe the benefits derived thereof. Evidence will be presented supporting the premise that some BCBAs are drifting from our bedrock principles, why this dangerous drift is occurring, and the negative impact it is causing. Suggestions will be made for stopping the drift and further strengthening the ethical code and certification so that all behavior analysts stay on the science path to best treatment. 

E50  Effectively Treating Escape-maintained Behavior without Extinction  APA  ASHA  BACB 

Kimberly Sloman, Ph.D., BCBA-D and Robert Isenhower, Ph.D., BCBA-D; Rutgers University, Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center
Escape is one of the most prevalent functions of severe problem behavior, comprising nearly one third of functional analysis outcomes. Limitations of the use of escape extinction have been reported, including implementation issues (setting policy, treatment integrity) and extinction bursts (increase in intensity of behavior, aggression). When extinction is not safe or feasible, other treatments must be considered. This workshop will discuss how to implement effective behavioral treatment for escape-maintained behavior without extinction. A variety of treatments including antecedent-based interventions (noncontingent reinforcement, curricular adaptation, choice) and positive reinforcement procedures will be illustrated through relevant research studies and case study examples with a special focus on troubleshooting implementation across a variety of settings.

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Lunch & Learns
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Three abbreviated sessions will be held each day for 60 minutes of the lunch break. No CEUs will be offered. Bring your boxed lunch and join us!

L4  A Love Letter to My Future Wife, From Your Autistic Husband 

Kerry Magro, M.A., KFM Making a Difference
When he was four, Kerry Magro was diagnosed with autism. Now in his ninth year as an autism advocate, Magro has traveled to over 700 events across the country sharing his insights to help others in our community. In this presentation, he will discuss his own personal experiences as an adult on the autism spectrum and being in love. His first-hand perspective on relationships will open the audience to a new line of thinking while breaking down any barriers of ignorance between autism and love. He will also discuss some of the challenges that face individuals with autism today in finding a partner, including topics such as social cues, empathy, communication patterns, and much, much more!

L5  Special Needs Planning from a Parent/Professional Perspective

Vincent Scanelli, LUTCF, MDRT, CLTC, Allstate
Saving for the future can seem unrealistic at times, but early planning could equal significant savings. Restructuring life insurance policies and ownership of assets and other steps may protect future services and the individual’s assets. Awareness of possible funds for planning and the dangers of not having assets correctly allocated could also be of great benefit. Professionals may also benefit from this topic so they can share the information with the families they support. Life insurance, IRA accounts, ABLE accounts, mutual funds, and annuities will all be discussed. 

L6  9 Ways to Avoid Conflict and Improve Outcomes Unfortunately, the presenter had an emergency conflict, so this workshop is cancelled. We hope to offer it next year.

Emerson Dickman, J.D., Law Office of G. Emerson Dickman
The NJ Supreme Court has indicated that in education disputes, “The adversary nature of the proceeding should yield to obtaining the right result for the child.” If all parties have the same goal, why is there so much conflict in the field of special education? In order to obtain “the right result for the child”, it is critical for a parent or advocate to be able to effectively communicate and collaborate with district personnel.  Understanding the interpersonal dynamics that impede meaningful communication is imperative. This presentation will introduce nine specific strategies for understanding causes and avoiding related conflict; including the role of attitude, how inherent bias influences behavior, active listening, reflective practice, and building trust. Empowered parents and informed instruction may ensure a successful child.  

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Session F
1:15pm to 2:30pm

F51  Things No One Ever Told Me After My Kid Was Diagnosed with autism  ASHA  SW

Frank Campagna, “Autism Daddy" blog
I'm a dad of a 13 year old son with severe/classic nonverbal autism and epilepsy. This presentation aims to show, in a humorous way, how to be a great autism parent without losing all of your former self. It will tackle important things that sometimes fall through the cracks. Topic points include "You're Allowed To Be Mad," "Autism Includes Some Perks," "You're Going to Get Advice From Everyone," and "Your Marriage Can Survive." A Q&A session will be included.  

F52  Connecting the Dots: Educating Children with Autism in Public School  ASHA

Mark Mautone, M.A., Hoboken Public School District
This workshop will review the methods of assessments and instruction that students with autism may experience in the public schools. This will include functional assessments, inclusion readiness assessments, and Birth-6th grade mapping standards. The presenters will demonstrate how to align the assessment results to teaching practice, goals, and to most commercial skills-based data systems. This workshop will also be filled with many teaching strategies that are used in public schools along with simple measurement systems that can be used in the general education setting by paraprofessionals. The importance of paraprofessional training and parent involvement will also be highlighted.

F53  Social Security Work Incentives 101 SW 

Gregory Makely, B.A., The Family Resource Network

Do work and SSI, SSDI, Medicare, and Medicaid mix? Many beneficiaries are hindered from pursuing work efforts due to fear of the impact earnings will have on these cash and healthcare benefits. This workshop will explain how to use SSA Work Incentives to protect SSI, SSDI, Medicare, and Medicaid benefits while starting, maintaining, or increasing work efforts. Participants will be given an overview of Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Work Incentives, NJ Workability Medicaid, continuing disability reviews, ticket usage, employment networks, and timely progress reviews. Knowing how to use these tools will allow beneficiaries and those supporting them to control the loss of benefits for as long as they are needed.

F54  Supporting Individuals during Healthcare Visits SW

Kathleen Freeman, Ph.D., RNC-NIC, Drexel University
Patients with ASD often present unique challenges to healthcare practitioners who may lack the specialized training needed to care for these individuals. Parents/caregivers play an important role in reducing escape and avoidance behaviors that often arise in healthcare environments; these may sabotage efficiency and effectiveness and negatively influence future encounters. The presenter, a nurse and mother of an adult child with ASD, will offer strategies intended to reduce the frequency of behaviors which interfere with care. Both families and professionals who support patients with ASD in the healthcare environment may benefit from this workshop.

F55  Writing Measurable and Specific IEP Goals  ASHA  BACB  

Michele Gardner, M.Ed., and Elizabeth Doerrbecker, Psy.D., BCBA-D; Berkeley Heights Public Schools
One of the keys to a student’s success and independence is carefully crafted goals and objectives in the Individualized Education Plan that are based on all that is known about that student and his/her needs. These goals are what should lead student programming for the year. Yet often, one of the weakest components of the IEP document is the goals/objectives section. This workshop will offer a detailed discussion of the law and what it means for IEP development for students with autism and provide a framework for developing comprehensive, specific goals and objectives. Participants will explore and discuss the challenge of writing goals that are meaningful for the student but still meet NJ law requirements. Criteria for mastery will be discussed as the final step toward exceptional IEP goal development.

F56  Using ABA to Build Executive Function Skills for Adolescents and Young Adults  APA  ASHA  BACB  SW

Beth Glasberg, Ph.D., BCBA-D, The Success Center; Deborah Silver, M.A., The Success Center; and John Barnard, M.S.Ed., BCBA, Bancroft School
This workshop will provide practical strategies for the application of behavior analysis to improve executive function skills in adolescents and young adults with ASD. Participants will learn how to assess and teach executive function skills and promote generalization and self-management. Through the use of case studies involving individuals with minimal support needs, the efficacy of our science in changing sophisticated, complex behaviors will be demonstrated. Participants will leave with behavior analytic lenses for conceptualizing executive function deficits as well as executive function lenses for conceptualizing common challenges such as anxiety, depression, and lack of academic ability. Specific assessment tools and teaching protocols will be shared.

F57  Best Practices for Transition Planning and Quality Indicators for Adult Programs  APA  ASHA  BACB  SW

Robert LaRue, Ph.D., BCBA-D and Christopher Manente, Ph.D., BCBA-D; Rutgers University, Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center
To ensure a successful transition from school to postschool environments, intervention and planning should begin early with an emphasis on addressing any barriers that will adversely affect students following graduation (e.g., maladaptive behavior, vocational skills, communicative ability, social skills). The challenges presented by individuals with ASD and intellectual disability (ID) highlight the need for high-quality programs that serve adults with significant challenges. These programs share common characteristics such as well-trained staff, evidence-based assessment and curriculum planning, and supports to address maladaptive behavior. The presenters will outline strategies for ensuring successful transitions to adulthood for individuals with ASD/ID as well as quality indicators to look for in adult programs.

F58  Evaluating Parent-implemented Interventions for Preschool Children  APA  ASHA  BACB

Michelle Soreth, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Rowan University
This workshop will review the results of an empirical evaluation of parent-implemented treatments for preschool children with ASD. Early interventions based on applied behavior analysis (ABA) have decades of empirical support but have not traditionally been designed for parent implementation. Recently, several developmental interventions have explicitly centered on parent implementation but have yet to undergo extensive empirical evaluation. This study compared two parent interventions, ABA based on Skinner’s Analysis of Verbal Behavior and Relationship Development Intervention®, with each other and against services as usual. We will review video and discuss the development and validation of both treatment manuals for the 3-month adjunctive, parent-implemented interventions, review the findings of these randomized pilot trials, and discuss policy implications.

F59  Crucial Considerations and Best Practices for Effective Supervision in Behavior Analysis, Part 1  APA  BACB 

Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Institute for Behavioral Studies, Endicott College and Samantha Russo, M.S.Ed., BCBA, Eden Autism Services
Supervision of behavior analytic services is essential to the development of competent professionals. As the field has become increasingly complex, supervisees must master a wide range of methodologies and be prepared to deal with diverse clinical, professional, and ethical challenges. This workshop will highlight best practices for supervision including training clinical skills in the context of our ethical code and using behavior analytic procedures to develop skills in supervisees. It will cover how to identify goals, instruct supervisees in essential skill sets, and measure their performance. A main focus will be the use of behavior skills training and performance-based evaluations of skill development. Strategies for building more complex skill sets such as effective collaboration and ethical decision-making will also be discussed, and tools to deliver and solicit feedback will be reviewed.

F60  Understanding Causes of Autism: Insights from Human Neural Stem Cells

James Millonig, Ph.D. and Smrithi Prem, B.S.; Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Autism affects the nervous system when it is just beginning to form in the first months of gestation. It affects many brain functions, especially social interactions and motor behaviors, but also language, cognition, sensation, and mood. These multiple abnormalities suggest there might be common and widespread disruptions in fundamental cellular processes and the molecular pathways that control cellular behaviors. Investigators are now studying human neurons and their precursors that can be generated from blood cells by using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technologies. The presenters' labs have found profound autism-specific developmental abnormalities and are now investigating whether these developmental and cellular signaling defects are commonly observed in autism. 

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Session G
2:45pm to 4:00pm 

G61  DDD Supports Program: Maximizing Opportunities  SW

Claudia Aboky-Djanty, NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities
This presentation will discuss the concepts of living a “meaningful life” and how the Supports Program can provide the services and supports to assist individuals. Participants will have a better understanding of what it means for individuals to have choice and involvement in planning their futures. Key concepts of employment, living arrangements, and community inclusion will be discussed. Information on how to access services and supports through the Supports Program and other available resources will be presented. 

G62  Surrogate Decision-making and the Guardianship Process

Erika Kerber, Esq., Community Health Law Project
This workshop will provide an overview of the different types of surrogate decision-­making, those that require court intervention and those that do not. Nonjudicial surrogate decision-making such as powers of attorney, advance directives, and similar instruments will be discussed. Surrogate decision-making which involves court intervention due to an individual's "incapacity" will be examined along with the different types of applications that can be made: conservatorship, limited guardianship, plenary guardianship, and special medical guardianship. The legal steps involved in filing for guardianship will be discussed, along with the obligations of a guardian once appointed by the court. [This workshop is not intended to train a person in filing a court application on their own without the consultation and assistance of a private attorney.]

G63  A Guide to Video-based Teaching Options  ASHA  BACB

Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ed.D., BCBA-D and Nicole Rzemyk, B.S.; Partners in Learning
Video modeling (VM) is a well researched, effective strategy used to teach social, self-care, and leisure skills to individuals with ASD. This workshop presents case studies of the main types of VM available: video peer modeling, in which the subject views a video of a similar aged/gender peer performing a task; video self-modeling, using clips edited to show the subject performing the task to criteria; point-of-view video modeling, in which the camera is angled to show what the participant would see; and continuous video modeling, using videos of multistep tasks, allowing for multiple repetitions of the video presentation ("looping"). Participants will learn how to design and measure the effectiveness of each procedure.

G64  A Culture of Acceptance: Teaching the School Community  ASHA  BACB  SW

Michele Gardner, M.Ed. and Elizabeth Doerrbecker, Psy.D., BCBA-D; Berkeley Heights Public Schools
Including students with autism in the least restrictive environment must be done carefully and thoughtfully. Peers and staff must be educated and prepared to accept and assist students with special needs. In this workshop, research and best practices will be discussed as they relate to successful inclusion of students with ASD. Participants will learn about working with parents to provide training to peers as well as creating peer interns who can prompt in the natural environment using the techniques of ABA. Participants will also learn strategies for creating an inclusive and supportive atmosphere throughout the school building.

G65  Don’t Give Up! Effective Interventions for Middle and High School Students  APA  ASHA  BACB  SW 

Laura Kenneally, Ed.D., BCBA-D, Heather Kovacs-Schroeck, M.S.Ed., and Kerry Beetel, M.A.; Southern Regional High School
Many individuals with autism engage in challenging behaviors during their middle and high school years that may have effectively punished caregivers and providers from addressing them. Not only can these behaviors limit their ability to enjoy family, school, or community activities, but left untreated, they may prevent their ability to succeed in employment or residential settings. This workshop will show how to address behaviors of older students in a positive, step-by-step manner. It will highlight case studies of middle and high school students: one student who was toilet trained at age 15, and two others whose aggressive or tantrumming behavior was reduced to near zero levels and maintained. The interventions will be thoroughly discussed in order to help parents and therapists apply these strategies.

G66  Crucial Considerations and Best Practices for Effective Supervision in Behavior Analysis, Part 2  APA  BACB

Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Institute for Behavioral Studies, Endicott College and Samantha Russo, M.S.Ed., BCBA, Eden Autism Services
Supervision of behavior analytic services is essential to the development of competent professionals. As the field has become increasingly complex, supervisees must master a wide range of methodologies and be prepared to deal with diverse clinical, professional, and ethical challenges. This workshop will highlight best practices for supervision including training clinical skills in the context of our ethical code and using behavior analytic procedures to develop skills in supervisees. It will cover how to identify goals, instruct supervisees in essential skill sets, and measure their performance. A main focus will be the use of behavior skills training and performance-based evaluations of skill development. Strategies for building more complex skill sets such as effective collaboration and ethical decision-making will also be discussed, and tools to deliver and solicit feedback will be reviewed.

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Christine James, MSW, LSW and Nkechi Ugoji, MSW, LSW; NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities
 


AUTISM NEW JERSEY
500 Horizon Drive, Suite 530 Robbinsville, NJ 08691
Phone: 609.588.8200; 800.4.AUTISM | Fax: 609.588.8858
Email: information@autismnj.org

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